A Seven Tin Day!

Having returned to our home port the race is on to consume our food stocks before they expire. Every few days we have a ‘lucky dip’ under the sofas, in the forward cabin, in the sail locker, under the bunks and even in the galley lockers and galley bilges to see what treasures we can find (there’s probably more food elsewhere but we have forgotten where we put it). We have opened our 16kg bread flour and so far it has made 3 inedible wheat bricks in the breadmaker, we have found some items that have taken in lots of

ARC Friends Revisited

In Guernsey we caught up with David and Ann Marie who kindly greeted us ashore and took us to the GYC for a drink. Next day they were kind enough to invite us to their home for a roast lamb dinner. We have carried a load of mint sauce for 9,000 miles in search of lamb (eventually we had the red current jelly on toast) but it was not to be found so this was terrific. It was also our first time in 14 months of sitting on a sofa, of the environment around us being quiet without having to

Holed up in Havelet Bay

There is some bad weather due so we are moving off anchor and into the pool tonight. It’s been relatively cold and the swell has been a constant, however, Sacha turned up next to us and joined us for dinner and a movie. He is piloting his Westerly back to the UK having done a solo circuit and will be sad to part with the sea life and his boat. He has taken some great pictures which we hope to blog shortly.

Ocean Sailor No More!

The beginning of the end. The Ocean Sailor gives up his freedom, nights rolling at anchor, tinned food in bowls, stories of the ocean wave, of fishing, of customs houses, boat boys, lobsters, wahoo & mahi-mahi, dolphin, whales, live blues, rum, dangers in the night, the meeting of so many nomadic friends and sleepless nights at sea lashing things to the deck, reefing and watching in exchange for…..Corporate Man!  I mean just who is that? It’s all wrong isn’t it? Mmmmm, go round again??? Which way is south? How satisfying will the future ‘long legs’ of 65nm across the Channel

Chuting down La Manche

Rounding Ushant we raised the cruising chute in the steady waters of La Manche, the English Channel, as we ran downwind toward Guernsey. Making up to 9.5 knots we decided not to fly the kite at night so as dusk fell we drew down the sock and packed it away all relatively easily. Now what did we learn on the ocean? Ah, yes, to reef down at night. But this is just the simple little old Channel, right? Home waters, only 65m deep, just coastal stuff. So we went into the night with a slight sea and full sail. The